Vacant Land owners – fined if waste,debris found – BBMP

Vacant Land owners – fined if waste,debris found – BBMP

Vacant land owner in Bengaluru will be fined if waste and debris is found in their plots up to Rs.25000/- if owners don’t clear debris and vegetation  within 15 days.

Bangalore, the capital of India’s modern economy and home to many of its high-tech workers, is drowning in its own waste.

“Bangalore used to be India’s cleanest city,” said, president of the National Solid Waste Association of India. “Now, it is the filthiest.”

BBMP’s order to clear waste from Vacant land :

The BBMP has turned its eyes on the garbage problem in Bengaluru.  Complying with the directions of the National Green Tribunal, the BBMP has issued a circular under Karnataka Municipal Act, 1976 to warn the land owners of empty sites or will be fined Rs.25000/-.

The civic body has issued a circular to its Assistant Executive Engineers (AEEs) of Solid Waste Management at the ward level.  The circular directs the AEEs to identify vacant sites that have waste, debris and vegetation and to issue notice to the vacant land owners.

The circular has been issued as part of implementing SWM Rules 2016.  It recommend filing a police complaint and pursuing a lawsuit against the concerned land owners.

BBMP Circular on Garbage dumping in Vacant Land :

Garbage dumping in vacant lands s a regular feature in Bengaluru.  A lot of effort has been made t tackle with problem with a trashy end.

The circular has been issued under KMC Act.

Section 256 – Public Notice ordering deposit of rubbish and filth by occupier

Section 257 – removal of rubbish and filth accumulation in large quantities on premises

Section 333 – fencing of building or lands and pruning of hedges and trees

Once the garbage is cleared, the vacant land owners will have to ensure the site is fenced and put up a signage asking not to dump waste and debris.

Circular to Vacant land owners :

The vacant land owners are required to clean garbage and debris in 15 days.  If fail to do so, the civic body will clean the debris but will levy a fine of Rs.25000/- to the BBMP.

The penalty will increase from Rs.50000/- to Rs. 1 lakh if the vacant land owners fail to keep their vacant land free from garbage.  The BBMP has the authority to file  a criminal case against the owners under section 462(2).

According to the circular, the waste segregation should take place at the source otherwise they will be liable to pay penalty under Section 431(A) of the Act.

The circular says :

  • Clear the site within 15 days or pay a fine of Rs.25000/-.  The amount levied from the landowner will be spent by the BBMP for clearing the site.
  • After fencing, put a signage against dumping trash
  • If the land owner fails to respond, the BBMP will clear the waste and  debris and collect a fine.  Extra amount will be collected with property tax.
  • If even after the issuance of circular, the vacant land owner fails to maintain the vacant plot the fine amount will increase up to Rs.50000/- to Rs. 1 lakh.
  • Complaints to be filed against landowners in case they refuse to clean up
  • Lawsuit to be filed against the law owner.

Dengue Menace :

Mr Naik instructed the Health officials to levy fines on owners of under-construction buildings and vacant land owners where fresh water had accumulated.

Against the backdrop of the increasing number of dengue cases, the BBMP is taking measures to prevent the spread of the disease.

Present scenario :

Garbage is Bengluru’s plague. It chokes water bodies, scars meadows, contaminates streets and feeds a vast and dangerous ecosystem of rats, mosquitoes, stray dogs, monkeys and pigs.

Perhaps even more than the fitful electricity and insane traffic, the ubiquitous garbage shows the incompetence of governance and the dark side of the city’s rapid economic growth. Greater wealth has spawned more garbage, and the managers of the city’s pell-mell development have been unable to handle the load.

Conclusion :

As Bengaluru’s population exploded with the success of its technology industry, the stresses in the waste system came close to a breaking point. Now, with Benglauru’s last landfill is to close permanently and the city running out of abandoned quarries to quietly divert a day’s load, the system may simply collapse.

Few expect Benglauru’s municipal government to solve the problem itself. Instead, a network of nonprofit groups has sprung up to carry out recycling schemes; these nongovernment organizations have embraced the thousands of rag pickers who daily paw through the city’s garbage to retrieve valuable refuse like paper, glass and certain plastics.

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