Footpaths to be free of encroachments in Bengaluru

Footpaths to be free of encroachments in Bengaluru

Footpaths to be free of encroachments in Benglauru.  Making footpaths free is an obligation by BBMP.   Illegal footpath encroachment has been narrowing the road, causing inconvenience to motorists and pedestrians.

Everyday we come across a lot of vehicles parked on footpaths and pavements.  Cars and two wheelers are parked on both sides of narrow residential lanes and there is two way movement of traffic and navigating through them. 

It has become a challenge for pedestrians especially those who are handicapped, having physical disability and senior citizens.

High court order on footpath encroachment :

The High Court of Karnataka on 10th June directed the civic body BBMP to file an affidavit within 3 weeks on the steps taken by the authorities to keep footpaths free of encroachment by shop owners.

This affidavit was in the wake of observing the citizens’ rights being affected if footpaths are not maintained in reasonably good condition.  The footpaths must be kept free of encroachments.

Purpose of footpath :

Public streets are made for traffic to move and likewise footpaths are made for the use of citizens for walking.

If the footpaths are encroaches, it will affect the right of citizens.  Footpaths have to be maintained so that citizens are able to walk freely.

Action by Police –  footpath encroachment :

The city traffic police are currently carrying out a week-long drive to clear encroachments of footpaths and make them more pedestrian friendly.

The police aims to ensure that footpaths across the city are free from street vendors, petty shops, illegal parking of vehicles and dumping of construction materials.

Those dumping construction materials like pipes or wires on the footpaths will also have to be careful. The materials will be seized and the offenders will have to pay a penalty to get it cleared.

BBMP unhelpful :

In some areas the traffic police are oblivious of the state of affairs. Despite a clear ruling by the High Court of Karnataka to clear footpath encroachments, the BBMP is not acting tough on the encroachers.

The traffic police have expressed their helplessness as it is the BBMP’s responsibility to clear the encroachment and not that of the police.

The section 288 and 288C of the KMC Act clearly allow the removal of encroachments, either temporary or permanent, on the existing footpaths falling within BBMP’s jurisdictional limits. However, several complaints to jurisdictional Assistant Executive Engineers by citizens have not yielded any results. They pass the buck at each other dodging responsibility.

Conclusion :

There are chances of serious accidents if the issues are not fixed on  road’s footpaths. The BBMP officials and people’s representatives including the Mayor should inspect the busy roads and the footpaths and implement a ‘zero tolerance’ on footpath encroachment. 

500 raised cross walks across Bengaluru :

To ensure safety of pedestrians crossing roads, the civic body BBMP has decided to build more than 500 raised cross walks across Bengaluru city with 15 cm. in height besides bumps.

Infra Boost :

The Traffic Police of Bengaluru city made a presentation demanding raised pedestrian crossings. They will come up on thoroughfare across the city.

The demands of Traffic Police includes :
  1. Pedestrian crossings at 221 locations
  2. Sky-walks/FOB’s at 86 locations
  3. Up-gradation of pedestrian crossings are 213 spots
  4. Relocation of electrical poles at 97 locations and 76 transformers
  5. Amenities at 47 accident black-spots
  6. Solution to water logging at 45 places
  7. Street light functioning at 105 locations

Areas Covered :

The initiative of 500 raised cross walks across Bengaluru City includes facilities along outer ring road, Sarjapur road, Magadi Road and some of the core areas in the city.

The 367 junctions includes facilities like traffic umbrellas, railings information and direction boards, painted cross walks, cameras at important junctions, traffic signage, hazard boards, street lights, removing of trees and widening of roads.

Vacant Land owners – fined if waste,debris found – BBMP

Vacant Land owners – fined if waste,debris found – BBMP

Vacant land owner in Bengaluru will be fined if waste and debris is found in their plots up to Rs.25000/- if owners don’t clear debris and vegetation  within 15 days.

Bangalore, the capital of India’s modern economy and home to many of its high-tech workers, is drowning in its own waste.

“Bangalore used to be India’s cleanest city,” said, president of the National Solid Waste Association of India. “Now, it is the filthiest.”

BBMP’s order to clear waste from Vacant land :

The BBMP has turned its eyes on the garbage problem in Bengaluru.  Complying with the directions of the National Green Tribunal, the BBMP has issued a circular under Karnataka Municipal Act, 1976 to warn the land owners of empty sites or will be fined Rs.25000/-.

The civic body has issued a circular to its Assistant Executive Engineers (AEEs) of Solid Waste Management at the ward level.  The circular directs the AEEs to identify vacant sites that have waste, debris and vegetation and to issue notice to the vacant land owners.

The circular has been issued as part of implementing SWM Rules 2016.  It recommend filing a police complaint and pursuing a lawsuit against the concerned land owners.

BBMP Circular on Garbage dumping in Vacant Land :

Garbage dumping in vacant lands s a regular feature in Bengaluru.  A lot of effort has been made t tackle with problem with a trashy end.

The circular has been issued under KMC Act.

Section 256 – Public Notice ordering deposit of rubbish and filth by occupier

Section 257 – removal of rubbish and filth accumulation in large quantities on premises

Section 333 – fencing of building or lands and pruning of hedges and trees

Once the garbage is cleared, the vacant land owners will have to ensure the site is fenced and put up a signage asking not to dump waste and debris.

Circular to Vacant land owners :

The vacant land owners are required to clean garbage and debris in 15 days.  If fail to do so, the civic body will clean the debris but will levy a fine of Rs.25000/- to the BBMP.

The penalty will increase from Rs.50000/- to Rs. 1 lakh if the vacant land owners fail to keep their vacant land free from garbage.  The BBMP has the authority to file  a criminal case against the owners under section 462(2).

According to the circular, the waste segregation should take place at the source otherwise they will be liable to pay penalty under Section 431(A) of the Act.

The circular says :

  • Clear the site within 15 days or pay a fine of Rs.25000/-.  The amount levied from the landowner will be spent by the BBMP for clearing the site.
  • After fencing, put a signage against dumping trash
  • If the land owner fails to respond, the BBMP will clear the waste and  debris and collect a fine.  Extra amount will be collected with property tax.
  • If even after the issuance of circular, the vacant land owner fails to maintain the vacant plot the fine amount will increase up to Rs.50000/- to Rs. 1 lakh.
  • Complaints to be filed against landowners in case they refuse to clean up
  • Lawsuit to be filed against the law owner.

Dengue Menace :

Mr Naik instructed the Health officials to levy fines on owners of under-construction buildings and vacant land owners where fresh water had accumulated.

Against the backdrop of the increasing number of dengue cases, the BBMP is taking measures to prevent the spread of the disease.

Present scenario :

Garbage is Bengluru’s plague. It chokes water bodies, scars meadows, contaminates streets and feeds a vast and dangerous ecosystem of rats, mosquitoes, stray dogs, monkeys and pigs.

Perhaps even more than the fitful electricity and insane traffic, the ubiquitous garbage shows the incompetence of governance and the dark side of the city’s rapid economic growth. Greater wealth has spawned more garbage, and the managers of the city’s pell-mell development have been unable to handle the load.

Conclusion :

As Bengaluru’s population exploded with the success of its technology industry, the stresses in the waste system came close to a breaking point. Now, with Benglauru’s last landfill is to close permanently and the city running out of abandoned quarries to quietly divert a day’s load, the system may simply collapse.

Few expect Benglauru’s municipal government to solve the problem itself. Instead, a network of nonprofit groups has sprung up to carry out recycling schemes; these nongovernment organizations have embraced the thousands of rag pickers who daily paw through the city’s garbage to retrieve valuable refuse like paper, glass and certain plastics.