Seed Ball technique – 1 lakh in 3 hrs. by Bangaloreans

Seed Ball technique – 1 lakh in 3 hrs. by Bangaloreans

Seed  ball technique   –  1 lakh seed balls were prepared by 600 Bangaloreans to Green Western Ghats.  Most environmentalists have termed this innovation as seeds of success due to its rapid growth rate.

Seed Ball is a unique and interesting method  in today’s age where the greenery is becoming a silent victim of modernization.  Seed balls work as a great idea for a sustainable environment in our concrete jungles.

Seed balls are an ancient technique for propagating plants from seeds without opening up soil with cultivation tools such as a plow.

Victim of urbanization :

Trees are often the first victim’s of Bengaluru’s march towards increased urbanization.  To encourage to grow trees and to reduce their rate of depletion, Seed Balls creations helps growing trees in the city.  

SayTrees – Organizer of Seed ball :

SayTrees is a professionally run group of ordinary people extraordinarily determined to protect the environment not just by themselves, but also by sensitizing others towards the importance of environment conservation and goading them on to participate in tree-plantation campaigns.  

The group consists of passionate nature lovers, who juggle corporate jobs during the week with their love for trees over the weekends. Though it started off as a weekend pursuit in 2007 now it does more than 50 tree plantation drives in 4 months of monsoon. 

Last year, SayTrees had made thousands of seed balls and were sown in Chintamani and Bagepalli.

Volunteers at Seed Ball project:

600 Bengalureans came together in Krishnarajapuram on weekend and made more than 100,000 seed balls. Within three hours they prepared around one lakh seed balls, which will go on to increase the green cover in Western Ghats.

Making of Seed ball by all age group

All age groups came together for the seed ball making. 

Objective of the project:

The members of the organisation SayTrees will take the seed balls to the forests of Kodagu in Karnataka and plant them next week with the help of the forest department. The group wants to re-green the area as thousands of trees were lost during the floods last year.

The aim of the campaign is to build urban forestry and provide greenery in barren lands by using the seed ball technique. 

How to make a seed ball?

herder3 for commons.wikimedia.org

Take some clay, pure some water it, roll it into a little ball, make a little hole in it, pop the seed into it and roll it up again.  Leave it to dry for 24 hours.  The seed ball is ready.

Contents of Seed Ball :

For the seed balls, a mixture of soil and manure is used and each seed ball contains one or more seeds inside. The group which cut across all age groups, made many varieties of seed balls.

The seed balls project had made eight varieties of seed balls including banyan, peepal and tamarind.

Why seed ball?

Among different initiatives to improve green cover, making and distributing seed balls in a quick and cost effective method to reclaim the lost green cover of environment.  It is an emerging afforestation technique.

With knowledge, skill, and patience, seed balls can be as effective a way of establishing plants as plow-seeding or drilling, and they can be made by anyone anywhere in the world that has access to clay, soil, and seed — for no money.

How it works?

The composition of seed balls makes it self-sustainable and favorable for germination in most environments.  Making seed balls are fund and easy.

The concept seed balls was started by Masanobu Fukuoka, a Japanese man famous for popularizing Natural farming, the concept has been adopted worldwide.

Seed balls can also be used to “over seed” existing ecosystems, without damaging the soil structure — or to seed productive plants into forested areas and steep hillsides where tillage is not possible. Seed balls can also be used in combination with animals such as pigs who will do the work of shuffling the mulch around providing seed balls extra cover.

Development of technique :

The technique for creating seed balls was rediscovered by Japanese natural farming pioneer Masanobu Fukuoka. The technique was also used, in ancient Egypt to repair farms after the annual spring flooding of the Nile.

In modern times, during the period of the Second World War, the Japanese government plant scientist working in a government lab, Fukuoka, who lived on the mountainous island of Shikoku, wanted to find a technique that would increase food production without taking away from the land already allocated for traditional rice production,  which thrived in the volcanic rich soils of Japan.

Advantages of using seed ball :

There are some advantages of using seed ball instead of using seeds directly:

  • Because there are nutrients in the seed  ball  in the form of compost or potting mix or cow dung,  it gives a leg up to germinating seeds – gives them nutrition in the early days when the young plant needs a little help to survive in harsh conditions.
  • The balls prevents animals or birds from eating up the seeds.
  • It takes less time to cover a large area – since one can simply throw the seed ball – so one could, for example, drive around in a car with thousands of seed bombs and a slingshot, and disperse the seed bombs all around while cruising in vehicle. In fact, there have been scenarios where seed bombs have been used for aerial reforestation by dispersing hundreds of thousands of seed bombs using a low flying aero-plane !

Seed Balls protect seeds from :

Winds – which blow them away

Birds and Rodents – which eat them

Hot Sun –  which bakes their vitality and

Excessive rain – Which carries them off.

Results of using Seed Ball :

With the rainfall, the clay coating melts and the seeds germinate where the ball has landed.  The seed balls will stay put until the seedlings have a chance to put down roots.  The seed balls will absorb moisture from the ground, the dew and the rain and will sprout when conditions are right. 

Many seeds will grow from a single seed ball and the plant most suited to the micro conditions of that site will prevail. perties

BRT – Biligiri Ranganatha Swamy Temple Tiger Reserve – No honking, Music

BRT – Biligiri Ranganatha Swamy Temple Tiger Reserve – No honking, Music

BRT – Biligiri Ranganatha Swamy Temple tiger reserve known as BRT hills has banned honking and playing of music inside the forest.

This move is to ensure tranquility of the natural surroundings where wild animals exist. 

The forest department has decided to raise awareness among tourists and motorists.  The commuters are refrained from honking and playing music while in transit on road passing through Biligiri Ranganatha Swmay Temple (BRT) Tiger Reserve.

B.R.Hills :

BRT Hills

The Biligirirangana Hills, commonly called BR Hills, is a hill range situated in south-eastern Karnataka at its border with Tamil Nadu (Erode District) in South India. The area is called Biligiriranganatha Swamy Temple Wildlife Sanctuary or simply BRT Wildlife Sanctuary.

It has been named after Rangaswamy temple that is embellished with a whitish rock at the helms of the sanctuary.

The sanctuary derives its name Biligiri (Kannada for white rock) from the white rock face that constitutes the major hill crowned with the temple of Lord Rangaswamy or from the white mist and the silver clouds that cover these hills for a greater part of the year. 

The hill is a  protected reserve under the Wildlife Protection Act of 1975.  Being at the confluence of the Western Ghats and the Eastern Ghats, the sanctuary is home to eco-systems that are unique to both the mountain ranges.

Flora and fauna at BRT :

The gift of a wonderful ecosystem is the worthy delight of flora, fauna and cultural wealth.  The amazing mix of the hills, ridges and grasslands of BRT tiger reserve resides an astounding variety of varied species of flora and fauna.

Bestowing a distinguished quality to the region of the wildlife sanctuary, the Soliga temple in K.Gudi sets an amazing blend of lush green forests and tents placed in the midst of wilderness.

There are hills which inhabit a wide variety of flora and fauna.  This unique sanctuary exhibits scrub, dry deciduous, moist deciduous, evergreen, semi evergreen and shoal forests.  It is widely known for its many endemic species of plants including valuable medicinal ones. 

Tiger Reserve :

BRT Tiger Reserve

The site was declared a tiger reserve  in January 2011 by the Karnataka government, a few months after approval from India’s National Tiger Conservation Authority.

The BR hills links the Eastern Ghats and the Western Ghats allowing animals to move between them and facilitating gene flow between populations of species in these areas. Thus, this sanctuary serves as an important biological bridge for the biota of the entire Deccan Plateau.

Spread over 583 sq. km, these jungles are home to tigers apart from leopards, chitals, dholes and other animals.

Data from the tiger censures done in 2017-18 indicates that there are around 63 tigers at BRT forest.

Birds and Animals found at BRT :

Animals Tiger, Gaur, Elephant, Wild dogs (Dholes), Sloth bears, Chital (Spotted Deer), Sambar Deer, Leopards, Jackals, Wild boars, Mouse Deer, Barking Deer, Mongoose etc.

Birds : Oriental white-backed vulture, greater spotted eagle, Nilgiri wood-pigeon, darters, oriental white ibis, greater grey headed fish eagle, red headed vulture, blue winged parakeet, Malabar grey hornbill, white bellied treepie, white cheeked barbet, Indian scimitar babbler, Malabar whistling thrush, painted bush quail, Sirkeer malkhoa, ashy prinia, Indian robin, Indian peafowl, yellow legged green pigeon.

Reptiles Mugger, Common vine snake, common wolf snake, rat snake, bamboo pit viper, Russell’s viper, common krait, Indian rock python, Indian monitor lizard, common toad.

Ban of honking and music at BRT :

The forest officials in Chamarajanagar have rolled out the initiative after incidents of violation of rules were observed by pilgrims visiting the Ranganatha Swamy and K.Gudi elephant camp situated inside the woods.

For the past week, forest department has deputed staff at the 2 entrances – Gumballu near Yelandur and Hondara balu close to Chamarajanagar.  The staff at these places are distributing pamphlets to motorists who are entering woods.  The pamphlets informs the motorists about the rules to be observed while inside in the forest.

Other rules to be followed at BRT :

Apart from initiating efforts to bring down noise pollution, the forest authorities are working towards raising safety standards.  Visitors are warned against stopping the vehicle in the forest, not to feed animals and not to venture in the forest unguarded and unprotected.

This initiative was in the wake of visitors disrupting the environs and tranquility of the forest and those   Vvsitors getting down of their vehicles to take selfies.

Those found violating the ruled will be given warning first time, if caught 2nd time a fine of upto Rs.1000/- will be collected.  Speed limit inside the forest is restricted to 30 kmph to avoid road kills.